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Courses for Spring 2008

Medical History and Bioethics 504:
Society and Health Care in American History

Instructor: Ronald Numbers

This course is designed to acquaint students with the history of health care in America. Although the focus will be on the past, efforts will be made to relate the past to the present.

Crosslisted with History of Science and with history

3 cr.; B (Biological Science), I (Intermediate)

11:00-12:15 MW

Prerequisites: Instructor consent required.


Medical History and Bioethics 531:
Women and Health in American History

Instructor: Judith Houck

Women’s relationship to medical institutions, constructions of disease, and their own bodies differs from that of men. This course examines historically the health issues women have faced and how those issues have differed according to race and class. In particular, it explores the personal experiences and the medical views of women’s life-cycle events, the role of women as health care providers and activists, and the effect of gender on the perception and meaning of illness.

Crosslisted with History of Science and with Women's Studies

3 cr.; B (Biological Science), I (Intermediate)

9:30-10:45 TR

Prerequisite: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 558:
Ethical Problems Raised by Biomedical Technology

Instructors: Norman Fost and Robert Streiffer

Ethical issues apparently created by new biomedical technologies, such as genetic screening, prenatal diagnosis, prolongation of life, treatment of severe birth defects, in vitro fertilization, behavior modification, psychosurgery, and transplantation.

Crosslisted with Philosophy

3 cr.; H (Humanities), I (Intermediate)

Lecture T 11:00-12:15; Discussions R 11:00-12:15, 9:30-10:45 or 2:30-3:45

Prerequisites: Junior standing; Includes graduate and professional careers


Medical History and Bioethics 565:
The Ethics of Modern Biotechnology

Instructor: Robert Streiffer

Study of ethical issues arising from the application of modern biotechnology to microorganisms, crops, and non-human animals. Readings cover moral theory, technology studies, political philosophy, the science used in biotechnology, and current regulations governing its use.

Crosslisted with Agronomy, Rural Sociology, and Philosophy

3 cr.; H (Humanities), I (Intermediate)

R 2:25pm - 4:55 pm

Prerequisite: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 668-001:
A History of Western Disability

Instructor: Walton Schalick

Disability is a word which surrounds us. From debates about end-of-life issues to Social Security from test-taking ‘allowances’ to Not-Dead-Yet, from Medicaid cutbacks to Terry Schiavo, disability is in the media, on our lips and in our ears. What is disability? How has disability changed over time and in different cultures? Where does such an idea come from? What social, cultural, and political assumptions is it based upon? Examining a wide range of historical arguments about the nature and purpose of disability, from pre-history to Plato, to medieval theologians, to more contemporary works, we will approach the history of disability in Western thought and social practice in terms of its relation to arguments about the role of human development and the formulation of personhood, citizenship, and social well being. The readings will include a thick mixture of primary sources in translation and secondary sources, both classic and newly published. We will encounter a variety of techniques and tools used by historians and other scholars as we course through the sessions. The emphasis of our discussions will be the characteristics of disability in a variety of centuries and cultures as well as lacunae in our understanding and debates in the literature.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 cr.; A (Advanced)

T 2:30pm - 5:00pm

Prerequisite: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 668-002:
Alternative Medicine in America

Instructor: Eric Boyle

This seminar provides a survey of alternative medical thought, institutions, and practitioners and examines changing concepts of health and disease in the history of the United States. In particular, we will discuss the nature of competition in the medical marketplace; points of negotiation between mainstream medicine, popular understandings of health, and alternative or complementary practices; competing definitions of science in medical research and practice; the role of institutions in health care delivery; and the relationship between politics and health care alternatives.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 cr.; A (Advanced)

TR, 2:30-3:45

Prerequisite: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 668-003:
Medical Technology

Instructor: Eric Boyle

This seminar examines how technology came to play a dominant role in medical research and practice in the twentieth century. We will discuss the relationship between technology and the production of medical knowledge; the important role played by technological advances in the process of medical professionalization; the complex relationships between technology, medical institutions, consumers, and industry; and the ways in which technology has played an integral role in shaping discussions of gender, sexuality, class, and race.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 cr.; A (Advanced)

TR, 11:00-12:15

Prerequisite: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 699:
Independent Study in Medical History

Instructor: Staff

To be arranged with instructor.

Not cross-listed

1-3 cr.; C (counts for L&S), A (Advanced)

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Jr st and cons instr


Medical History and Bioethics 720:
AIDS

Instructor: Richard Keller

How and in what ways is HIV/AIDS more than a retroviral infection? How does this disease provide a critical filter for mapping the patterns and mechanisms of global interaction in the twenty-first century? This one-credit elective explores the global AIDS pandemic from social and humanistic perspectives. The course will provide an intensive introduction to the relationships between biology, culture, and society in an era of globalization that the pandemic reveals and shapes. A central focus for the course is the inextricability of connections between the epidemiological, political, economic, and historical dimensions of HIV/AIDS. Key themes include the origins of AIDS; the meaning of risk; disease, poverty, and development; race, gender, and vulnerability; the politics of HIV/AIDS research and prevention; epidemics and epizootics: the links between human and simian AIDS; and the experience of AIDS.

Not cross-listed

1 cr.; Graduate, basic

W, 12:05-12:55

Prerequisite: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 728:
Biomedical Ethics and Society

Instructor: Linda Hogle

Social science perspectives on medicine with emphasis on biomedical ethics. Overview of the qualitative research methods of ethnography, life history, content, visual and narrative analysis. (course flyer)

Not cross-listed

3 cr.; Graduate, basic

F 9:00 am - 11:30 am

Prerequisites: Grad st. One of the following: Anthro 365, Soc 531, Pop Hlth 780 or equivs, or cons inst.


Medical History and Bioethics 734:
Regenerative Medicine: Ethical and Social Issues

Instructor: Linda Hogle

Stem cell, tissue engineering and nanobiotech in social contexts. Ethical and political issues in emerging research & clinical areas. For grad students in science or bioengeneering, medicine, population health; others by permission.

Not cross-listed

2 cr.; Graduate, basic

M 4:00 pm - 6:30 pm

Prerequisites: Grad st. or cons inst


Medical History and Bioethics 890:
Reading and Research

Instructor: Staff

To be arranged with instructor.

Not cross-listed

1-3 cr. A (Advanced)

Time to be arranged

Prereq: Open to all 4th yr Med stdts (8 or 16 wks) & Grad stdts of all other depts (16 wks)


Medical History and Bioethics 919:
Gender Health and Illness in United States History

Instructor: Judith Houck

How are health and illness gendered? This seminar will explore the gendered experience and construction of both health and illness in American history. It will explore four central questions: How do gendered constructions of health, fitness, and illness create and reinforce racial and class divisions? How have health concerns led to race, class, and sex-centered social activism? How and why are issues of health and illness important to nationalism? How are health, illness, and consumerism linked?

This should be considered a “reading” seminar. Assignments will include book reviews, class presentations, and a historiographical essay.

Not cross-listed

3 cr.; Graduate, advanced

M 2:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Prerequisites: Grad st. or cons inst


Medical History and Bioethics 999-001:
Advanced Independent Study

Instructors: Robert Streiffer and Sara Patterson

For doctoral students in the life sciences disciplines not already served by the existing courses in human biomedical research ethics. Meets with Hort 875 in Plant Sci 473.

Not cross-listed

1 cr.; Graduate, basic

W 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm

Prerequisites: Grad st. or cons inst


Medical History and Bioethics 999:
Advanced Independent Study

Instructor: Staff

To be arranged with instructor.

Not cross-listed

1-3 cr.; A (Advanced)

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Grad stdts who have the Masters or equiv, or Postdoc fellows who wish to undertake an independent research project.

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