Early operating theater

Courses for Spring 2009

Medical History and Bioethics 431:
Childbirth in the US

Instructor: Judith Leavitt

American women's childbirth experiences from the colonial period to the present. Childbirth as a cultural as well as a biological event. Basic physiological information for understanding and evaluating changing approaches to pregnancy and childbirth.

Crosslisted with History of Science and with Women's Studies

3 cr.; S (Social Science), D (Intermediate or Advanced)

1:00-2:15 TR

Prerequisites: Women St 103 or 430 or equiv; or cons inst


Medical History and Bioethics 508:
Health, Disease & Healing II

Instructor: Richard Keller

Medicine in Europe from the 18th century to mid-20th century, investigating changes in disease and demography, state interest in health care, the medical professions, and both scientific and alternative medical ideas.

Crosslisted with History of Science and with History

3 cr.; H (Humanities), I (Intermediate)

2:30-3:45 TR

Prerequisites: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 558:
Ethical Problems Raised by Biomedical Technology

Instructor: Norman C. Fost

Ethical issues apparently created by new biomedical technologies, such as genetic screening, prenatal diagnosis, prolongation of life, treatment of severe birth defects, in vitro fertilization, behavior modification, psychosurgery, and transplantation.

Crosslisted with Philosophy

3 cr.; H (Humanities), I (Intermediate)

Lecture T 11:00-12:15; Discussions R 11:00-12:15, 9:30-10:45 or 2:30-3:45

Prerequisites: Junior standing; Includes graduate and professional careers


Medical History and Bioethics 559:
Latino Health: Issues, Bioethics and Culture

Instructor: Jo Scheder

This interdisciplinary course is grounded in medical anthropology, Latina/o Studies, and bioethics, with special attention to the experience of health and illness, beliefs and practices, and health disparities. Latino/as are now the ‘majority minority’ population in the United States, yet the cultural dynamism, variation and beliefs of Latino/as are largely unknown to health practitioners and researchers, or are assumed to parallel those of the dominant culture of the U.S. Latina/os are over-represented in a host of chronic diseases, and have disproportionate exposure to environmental sources of ill health. Latino/as were at the forefront of the environmental health movement and pioneered the use of community-based health workers, yet they remain under-represented in the health professions. They have been subjected to medical experimentation, but currently are left out of many positive health research agendas. The course will consider how the diverse experiential histories of Mexican, Caribbean and Central Americans contribute differently to health status, relative risks for illness, access to care, and to health beliefs and practices.

Provisional topic areas include: 1) Bio-Ethical issues: Contemporary concerns and historical legacies: -Testing of contraceptives on Latinas -Involuntary sterilizations -Palliative care and end-of-life concerns -Aging and elder care; 2) Disparities: Diabetes, HIV and other diseases: -Current research on discrimination, racism and illness -Access to care, and equity/disparities in treatment -Environmental justice & health; 3) Beliefs and Practices: the meaning of health and illness: -Ethnomedicine – traditional healing, e.g., curanderismo, yerbas, etc.; pilgrimage sites and shrines; variation in contemporary practices and explanatory models -Interactions with Health Care Providers; 4) Stress in relation to health and mental health issues; 5) Health in relation to trauma, e.g., war, dislocation (refugee, immigrant concerns)

Meets with CHICAL 530

3 cr.; H (Humanities), D (Intermediate or Advanced)

2:30-5:00 W

Prerequisites: Cons inst; enrollment may be limited depending on topic and approach


Medical History and Bioethics 565:
The Ethics of Modern Biotechnology

Instructor: Staff

Study of ethical issues arising from the application of modern biotechnology to microorganisms, crops, and non-human animals. Readings cover moral theory, technology studies, political philosophy, the science used in biotechnology, and current regulations governing its use.

Crosslisted with Agronomy, Rural Sociology, and Philosophy

3 cr.; H (Humanities), I (Intermediate)

Time TBA

Prerequisite: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 668-001:
A History of Western Disability

Instructor: Walton Schalick

Disability is a word which surrounds us. From debates about end-of-life issues to Social Security from test-taking ‘allowances’ to Not-Dead-Yet, from Medicaid cutbacks to Terry Schiavo, disability is in the media, on our lips and in our ears. What is disability? How has disability changed over time and in different cultures? Where does such an idea come from? What social, cultural, and political assumptions is it based upon? Examining a wide range of historical arguments about the nature and purpose of disability, from pre-history to Plato, to medieval theologians, to more contemporary works, we will approach the history of disability in Western thought and social practice in terms of its relation to arguments about the role of human development and the formulation of personhood, citizenship, and social well being. The readings will include a thick mixture of primary sources in translation and secondary sources, both classic and newly published. We will encounter a variety of techniques and tools used by historians and other scholars as we course through the sessions. The emphasis of our discussions will be the characteristics of disability in a variety of centuries and cultures as well as lacunae in our understanding and debates in the literature.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 cr.; A (Advanced)

MW 2:30pm - 3:45pm

Prerequisites: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 668-002:
American Public Health and the Law

Instructor: Staff

This course explores the historical context of various United States Supreme Court cases important to the development of American public health and medicine in the 19th and 20th centuries. This is not a public health law course, but rather one that uses a legal perspective to understand the history of public health and medicine in America. It will cover cases that feature conflicts over civil liberties and public health. Taught in a lecture/discussion format, students will read a selection of both primary and secondary sources to study the historical and constitutional issues raised by each case.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 cr.; A (Advanced)

Time TBA

Prerequisite: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 699:
Independent Study in Medical History

Instructor: Staff

To be arranged with instructor.

Not cross-listed

1-3 cr.; C (counts for L&S), A (Advanced)

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Jr st and cons instr


Medical History and Bioethics 708:
Health, Disease and Healing II

Instructor: Richard Keller

Advanced readings in primary and secondary literature concerning medicine in Europe from the 18th century to mid-20th century, investigating changes in disease and demography, state interest in health care, and medical professions, and both scientific and alternative medical ideas.

Not cross-listed

1 cr.; Graduate, advanced

Time TBA

Prerequisites: Grad st & con reg in Med Hist 508


Medical History and Bioethics 720:
AIDS

Instructor: Richard Keller

How and in what ways is HIV/AIDS more than a retroviral infection? How does this disease provide a critical filter for mapping the patterns and mechanisms of global interaction in the twenty-first century? This one-credit elective explores the global AIDS pandemic from social and humanistic perspectives. The course will provide an intensive introduction to the relationships between biology, culture, and society in an era of globalization that the pandemic reveals and shapes. A central focus for the course is the inextricability of connections between the epidemiological, political, economic, and historical dimensions of HIV/AIDS. Key themes include the origins of AIDS; the meaning of risk; disease, poverty, and development; race, gender, and vulnerability; the politics of HIV/AIDS research and prevention; epidemics and epizootics: the links between human and simian AIDS; and the experience of AIDS.

Not cross-listed

1 cr.; Graduate, basic

W, 12:05-12:55

Prerequisites: Junior standing


Medical History and Bioethics 734-002:
Regenerative Medicine, Ethics and Society

Instructor: Linda Hogle

This graduate-level course is designed to introduce students to ethical, policy and social issues related to regenerative medicine, specifically stem cell research. Students will gain an understanding of current and past legal, political and moral issues related to the derivation of embryos for research, be familiar with guidelines for research ethics (including derivation of cells, donor issues) and gain an understanding of the relations of governments, various public groups and the media in the face of controversial research. Clinical ethics issues specific to stem cell research (adult and embryonic) will be illustrated using examples of existing and potential clinical trials.

Appropriate for students in public health, law, or the social sciences, as well as medical, science and engineering students interested in regenerative medicine-related research. Meets full semester, more in-depth than 1 credit option.

Not cross-listed

3 cr.

1:30 pm to 3:45 pm Fridays

Prerequisites: consent of instructor


Medical History and Bioethics 734-003:
Regenerative Medicine, Ethics and Society

Instructor: Linda Hogle

This graduate-level course is designed to introduce students to ethical, policy and social issues related to regenerative medicine, specifically stem cell research. Students will gain an understanding of current and past legal, political and moral issues related to the derivation of embryos for research, be familiar with guidelines for research ethics (including derivation of cells, donor issues) and gain an understanding of the relations of governments, various public groups and the media in the face of controversial research. Clinical ethics issues specific to stem cell research (adult and embryonic) will be illustrated using examples of existing and potential clinical trials.

Designed for med students, postdoctoral and grad students in the biosciences and engineering, particularly those conducting research in regenerative medicine. Meets first 7 weeks only.

Not cross-listed

1 cr.

1:30 pm to 3:45 pm Fridays

Prerequisites: Graduate standing


Medical History and Bioethics 890:
Reading and Research

Instructor: Staff

To be arranged with instructor.

Not cross-listed

1-3 cr. A (Advanced)

Time to be arranged

Prereq: Open to all 4th yr Med stdts (8 or 16 wks) & Grad stdts of all other depts (16 wks)


Medical History and Bioethics 919:
Food Politics: History, Science and Policies about Diet and Nutrition

Instructor: Susan Lederer

This graduate seminar focuses on the recent and renewed interest in food, its production, distribution, marketing and consumption. From farm to fork, from meat to mung bean, paleoagriculture to genetically modified foods, the foods people have eaten and continue to eat reflect assumptions about culture, morality, nutrition and health. From the vantage point of history of medicine and history of science, this seminar considers issues of food safety, the development of nutritional guidelines, and the ways science and medicine have influenced food and diet.

Not cross-listed

3 cr.; Graduate, advanced

M 9:55 am - 11:55 am

Prerequisites: Grad st. or cons inst


Medical History and Bioethics 999:
Advanced Independent Study

Instructor: Staff

To be arranged with instructor.

Not cross-listed

1-3 cr.; A (Advanced)

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Grad stdts who have the Masters or equiv, or Postdoc fellows who wish to undertake an independent research project.

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