Early operating theater

Courses for Fall 2011

Medical History and Bioethics 504:
Society and Health Care in American History

Instructor: Ronald Numbers

Health care in America since the colonial period; emphasis on social developments. Although the focus will be on the past, efforts will be made to relate the past to the present. Class discussion and intensive writing required.

Crosslisted with History and History of Science.

3 credits. Biological Science. Counts toward the Natural Science requirement. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

11:00 - 12:15 MW

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 513:
Environment and Health in Global Perspective

Instructor: Helen Tilley

What explains the distribution of different diseases around the world and how have these patterns changed over time? In what ways have the growth of cities, new industries, extractive economies, mass migrations, and “global colonialism” shaped human health? Why are most societies having to confront newly emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases? Is it fair to claim that we are now facing health and environmental emergencies on a planetary scale? If so, who or what is being hardest hit and can these patterns be reversed? To what extent are national and international health policies influenced by the coexistence of multiple medical traditions around the world?

This course begins to answer these questions by exploring the dynamic interplay among local and global environments and human and non-human health over the last five hundred years. We will consider both the history of ideas about environment and disease as well as the ways in which changing environments have affected well-being. In addition, we will examine how places – as sites of study, experimentation, and intervention – have mattered to the production of knowledge and the control of disease. We will also investigate various social, economic, and political phenomena that have impinged upon and influenced health and healing on regional and global levels.

Crosslisted with Environmental Studies and History of Science.

3 credits. Either Humanities or Social Science. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Advanced.

9:30 - 10:45 T/TH

Prerequisites: Junior status.


Medical History and Bioethics 526:
Medical Technology and the Body

Instructor: Linda Hogle

There is a long history of bodily modification throughout time and across societies. Modifications can be for functional restoration, augmentation, enhancement, or aesthetic purposes and may involve chemical, mechanical, interactive or implantable technologies. This course explores the ways that bodily modifications and the development of body-altering technologies co-evolve with social and technical understandings of appearance, function and perception. We begin with a critical examination of concepts of the ‘normal’ body, followed by cultural understandings of ability, appearance, function and enhancement. Topics will include bionics, organ and tissue substitution, assistive technologies, neural prosthetics, cognitive enhancements, augmented reality/ ambient computing and sensing, among others. The course is of interest to students in pre-professional medical fields, biomedical engineers, social sciences, disability studies.

Not cross-listed

3 credits; Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

4:00pm-6:40pm Mondays

Prerequisites: Sophomore status or consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 531:
Women and Health in American History

Instructor: Judith Houck

Women's relationship to medical institutions, constructions of disease, and their own bodies differs from that of men. This course examines historically the health issues women have faced and how those issues have differed according to race and class. In particular, it explores the personal experiences and the medical views of womens life-cycle events, the role of women as health care providers and activists, and the effect of gender on the perception and meaning of illness.

Crosslisted with Gender/Women’s Studies and History of Science.

3 credits; Biological Science. Counts toward the Natural Science required. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

9:30-10:45pm T/TH

Prerequisites: Junior status and consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 543:
Doctors & Delusions: Madness and Medicine in the Modern Era

Instructor: Richard Keller

This course examines the relationship between insanity and its social and historical contexts between the 18th-century birth of the asylum and contemporary debates about depression and psychopharmacology. Major themes include the shifting meanings of madness for social categories like class, race, and gender. While the principal focus will be the place of madness and psychiatry in Western medicine, comparisons with Africa and Asia will also play a role in the course. We will examine the history of madness through a close reading of medical, sociological, philosophical, and popular literature. Focused readings of these texts will help reveal changes in social, medical, and aesthetic views on psychopathology in the modern period, providing a basis for understanding the place of madness in the contemporary world.

Graduate students registered in 543 must register concurrently in MHB 743.

Crosslisted with History of Science and with History.

3 credits; Either Humanities or Social Science Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

11:00-12:15pm T/TH

Prerequisites: Junior status or consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 545:
Ethical and Regulatory Issues in Clinical Investigation

Instructor: Norman Fost

This course will explore and examine the ethical issues central to clinical research, regulations governing clinical investigation, and the role of good clinical practice for clinical trials. Participants who master this course material will be able to think critically about the ethical issues central to clinical research and know the basic elements of the federal regulations affecting clinical investigation.

Not cross-listed

1 credit; Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Advanced.

3:30-5:30 W

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 553:
International Health and Global Society

Instructor: Richard Keller

Intense concern over the burgeoning of emerging infectious diseases–along with the renewed vigor of known epidemics–has heightened medical, media, and popular attention to the international dimensions of health in a globalizing society. Yet historians have long recognized the “microbial unification of the world” as a phenomenon that dates at least to the Black Death of the fourteenth century. Drawing on a wide range of historical and anthropological materials and methods, this course explores the history of public health and medicine as international phenomena, concentrating chiefly on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Specific topics include the connections between global pandemics such as cholera and plague to European colonial expansion; the rise of international aid organizations; historical and contemporary anxieties about global migration and the spread of disease; and the international dimensions of a global medical marketplace. Particular themes include the connection between culture and medical ideas and practices; and the tensions of practicing medicine in multi-cultural settings.

Graduate students registered in 553 must register concurrently in MHB 753.

Crosslisted with History of Science and with Population Health.

3 credits; Either Humanities or Social Science. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

2:30-3:45 T/TH

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status, or consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 559-001:
Justice and Health Care

Instructor: Paul Kelleher

This course will examine ethical issues in the distribution, financing, and delivery of health care in the United States. We will focus in particular on central issues raised by the recent U.S. health care reform debate and resulting legislation. Readings will be drawn from political philosophy, health care economics, behavioral economics, nonprofit thinktank white papers, Congressional testimony, news articles, and blog posts. The first half of the class will consist of units exploring the philosophical and economic bases underlying currently dominant perspectives on putative entitlements to health care. We will seek to understand health economists’ concern to promote the “efficiency” of health resource allocation while constraining the “moral hazard” they detect when individuals use “too much” health care. In this context we will strive to identify values that may either compete with or override concerns with efficiency, so construed. The second half of the class will consist of units investigating the nature, justifiability, and methods of health care rationing—including bedside rationing by doctors—and the myriad issues implicated by the near-universally shared goal of health care cost containment. If time allows, we will further examine one of the following two questions: (1) Are there ethically defensible alternatives to the current patent regime for pharmaceutical development that could reduce drug costs while offering adequate or even enhanced levels of innovation?; (2) What, if anything, does a just government owe immigrants (legal and illegal) when it comes to health care?

Not cross-listed

3 credits; Humanities. Counts for up to 20 degree credits in L&S. Intermediate or Advanced.

11:00-12:15 T/TH

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or Higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 561:
Greek and Roman Medicine and Pharmacy

Instructor: John Scarborough

Greek and Roman medicine and drug lore from the Pre-Socratics to Oribasius (c. 600 B.C. - A.D. 350), including the backgrounds of ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian medicine.

Crosslisted with Classics, History of Science, History, and S&A PHM.

3 credits; Humanities, Intermediate, Advanced.

TuTh 2:30PM - 3:45PM

Prerequisites: Jr or Sr st, or cons inst.


Medical History and Bioethics 565:
The Ethics of Modern Biotechnology

Instructor: Robert Streiffer

Study of ethical issues arising from the application of modern biotechnology to microorganisms, crops, and non-human animals. Readings cover moral theory, technology studies, political philosophy, the science used in biotechnology, and current regulations governing its use.

Crosslisted with Agronomy, Philosophy, and Community and Environmental Sociology.

3 credits; Humanities. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

2:25-4:55pm Thursdays

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or Higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 713:
Environment and Health in Global Perspective

Instructor: Helen Tilley

What explains the distribution of different diseases around the world and how have these patterns changed over time? In what ways have the growth of cities, new industries, extractive economies, mass migrations, and “global colonialism” shaped human health? Why are most societies having to confront newly emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases? Is it fair to claim that we are now facing health and environmental emergencies on a planetary scale? If so, who or what is being hardest hit and can these patterns be reversed? To what extent are national and international health policies influenced by the coexistence of multiple medical traditions around the world?

This course begins to answer these questions by exploring the dynamic interplay among local and global environments and human and non-human health over the last five hundred years. We will consider both the history of ideas about environment and disease as well as the ways in which changing environments have affected well-being. In addition, we will examine how places – as sites of study, experimentation, and intervention – have mattered to the production of knowledge and the control of disease. We will also investigate various social, economic, and political phenomena that have impinged upon and influenced health and healing on regional and global levels.

Crosslisted with Environmental Studies and History of Science.

1 credit.

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Graduate status and concurrent registration in Med Hist 513.


Medical History and Bioethics 726:
Medical Technology and the Body

Instructor: Linda Hogle

There is a long history of bodily modification throughout time and across societies. Modifications can be for functional restoration, augmentation, enhancement, or aesthetic purposes and may involve chemical, mechanical, interactive or implantable technologies. This course explores the ways that bodily modifications and the development of body-altering technologies co-evolve with social and technical understandings of appearance, function and perception. We begin with a critical examination of concepts of the ‘normal’ body, followed by cultural understandings of ability, appearance, function and enhancement. Topics will include bionics, organ and tissue substitution, assistive technologies, neural prosthetics, cognitive enhancements, augmented reality/ ambient computing and sensing, among others. The course is of interest to students in pre-professional medical fields, biomedical engineers, social sciences, disability studies.

Not cross-listed

1 credit.

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Graduate status and concurrent registration in Med Hist 526 or consent of Instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 728:
Biomedical Ethics and Society

Instructor: Linda Hogle

The aims of this course are to provide understandings of the broader social, cultural and political contexts in which debates around medical science and practice occur, and to examine the use of qualitative and interdisciplinary methods to conduct research in these areas. Readings and discussion will draw upon perspectives from social science, bioethics and science policy research and will include ethnography, historical analysis, life history & patient narrative analysis, and cultural theory. The course will cover issues in both clinical and public health settings, and may emphasize one or the other depending on the interests of enrolled students. It is designed for the needs of graduate students in the social sciences and humanities, population health sciences, health policy, law, medicine, and health professions.

Topics include the ethics of clinical trials (domestic and international, ethics of first-in-human research), biosecurity (pandemics, vaccines, disasters), death and disorders of consciousness, dilemmas posed by technology (the politics of diagnosis and treatments, new subjectivities in interaction with devices) among others.

Not cross-listed

1-3 credits.

9:00-11:40 Fridays

Prerequisites Graduate status. One of the following: Anthro 365, Soc 531, Pop Hlth 780 or equivs, or consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 743:
Doctors & Delusions: Madness and Medicine in the Modern Era

Instructor: Richard Keller

See MHB 543. Advanced readings in primary and secondary literature of the history of psychiatry, with emphasis on historiographical issues.

Crosslisted with History of Science.

1 credit.

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Graduate status & concurrent registration in Medical History 543, or consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 753:
International Health and Global Society

Instructor: Richard Keller

See MHB 553. Advanced readings in primary and secondary literature.

Crosslisted with History of Science and with Population Health.

1 credit.

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Graduate status & concurrent registration in Medical History 553, or consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 919:
Food Politics: History, Science, and Politics of Diet and Nutrition

Instructor: Susan Lederer

This graduate seminar focuses on the recent and renewed interest in food, its production, distribution, marketing and consumption. From farm to fork, from meat to mung bean, paleoagriculture to genetically modified foods, the foods people have eaten and continue to eat reflect assumptions about culture, morality, nutrition, science and health. From the vantage point of medical history and history of science, this seminar considers the development of ideas about food safety, the creation of nutritional guidelines, and the myriad ways that science and medicine have influenced food consumption and dietary regulation. (course flyer)

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 credits.; A (Advanced)

1:20-3:15 Tuesdays

Prerequisites: Graduate status and consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 999:
Advanced Independent Study

Instructor: Robert Streiffer

The purpose of this course is to help graduate students, especially those within the life sciences, to understand the policies regulating research and the ethical principles on which these policies are based. Topics vary but will typically include an introduction to ethical reasoning, the research mission of land grant universities, professional codes of conduct, research misconduct, humans subjects research, ethical issues in design and statistics, mentoring, intellectual property, authorship, and peer review.

Not cross-listed

1 cr.; A (Advanced)

9:30 - 10:45 Wednesdays

Prerequisites: Graduate students who have the Masters or equiv, or Postdoc fellows who wish to undertake an independent research project.

© 2018 University of Wisconsin Board of Regents