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Courses for Fall 2012

Medical History and Bioethics 333:
History of Modern Biology

Instructor: Lynn Nyhart

Survey of major developments in biology and related sciences, ca. 1700-1950. Topics include morphology and embryology; evolutionary theory, ecology, and genetics: physiology and recent experimental biology.

Crosslisted with History of Science.

3 credits. Biological Science. Counts toward the Natural Science requirement. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

2:30pm - 3:45pm MW

Prerequisites: Junior Status or Consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 504:
Society and Health Care in American History

Instructor: Andrew Ruis

This courses examines the social and cultural history of sickness and health in the United States. Topics include the rise of medical authority, challenges to medical orthodoxy (alternative and complementary medicine), and the patient's experience of illness.

Crosslisted with History and History of Science.

3 credits. Biological Science. Counts toward the Natural Science requirement. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

11:00am - 12:15pm MW

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. And must be Junior status or higher (including graduate and professional careers). Excludes university Special and Guest students.


Medical History and Bioethics 505:
Topics in Ethics and History of Medicine
Topic: Justice and Health Care

Instructor: J. Paul Kelleher

This course will examine ethical issues in the distribution, financing, and delivery of health care in the United States. We will focus in particular on central issues raised by the recent U.S. health care reform debate and resulting legislation. Readings will be drawn from political philosophy, health care economics, behavioral economics, nonprofit thinktank white papers, Congressional testimony, news articles, and blog posts. The first half of the class will consist of units exploring the philosophical and economic bases underlying currently dominant perspectives on putative entitlements to health care. We will seek to understand health economists' concern to promote the "efficiency" of health resource allocation while constraining the "moral hazard" they detect when individuals use "too much" health care. In this context we will strive to identify values that may either compete with or override concerns with efficiency, so construed. The second half of the class will consist of units investigating the nature, justifiability, and methods of health care rationing-including bedside rationing by doctors-and the myriad issues implicated by the near-universally shared goal of health care cost containment. If time allows, we will further examine one of the following two questions: (1) Are there ethically defensible alternatives to the current patent regime for pharmaceutical development that could reduce drug costs while offering adequate or even enhanced levels of innovation?; (2) What, if anything, does a just government owe immigrants (legal and illegal) when it comes to health care?

Not cross-listed

3 credits.

11:00am-12:15pm T/TH

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 531:
Women and Health in American History

Instructor: Karen L. Walloch

Women's relationship to medical institutions, constructions of disease, and their own bodies differs from that of men. This course examines historically the health issues women have faced and how those issues have differed according to race and class. In particular, it explores the personal experiences and the medical views of womens life-cycle events, the role of women as health care providers and activists, and the effect of gender on the perception and meaning of illness.

Crosslisted with Gender/Women's Studies and History of Science.

3 credits. Biological Science. Counts toward the Natural Science required. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

9:30am-10:45am T/TH

Prerequisites: Junior status or higher (including graduate and professional careers). Excludes university Special and Guest students.


Medical History and Bioethics 545:
Ethical and Regulatory Issues in Clinical Investigation

Instructor: Norman Fost

This course will explore and examine the ethical issues central to clinical research, regulations governing clinical investigation, and the role of good clinical practice for clinical trials. Participants who master this course material will be able to think critically about the ethical issues central to clinical research and know the basic elements of the federal regulations affecting clinical investigation.

Not cross-listed

1 credit. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Advanced.

3:30pm-5:30pm W

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 550:
Topics: Medical Technologies in Historical Perspective

Instructor: Dayle DeLancey

From imaging devices to pharmaceuticals, medical technologies are often among the most novel and controversial aspects of contemporary society. Yet, U.S. history reveals that neither the emergence of high-profile medical technologies nor the dilemmas that often accompany their arrival are strictly 'modern-day' phenomena. History also demonstrates that such technologies tend to reflect not only the medical science, but also the social concerns, of the periods in which they have emerged. In this course, we will explore the ways in which a range of technologies – e.g. stethoscopes, spirometers, sphygmomanometers, hospital design, x-rays, reproductive technologies, gene therapy, virtual medicine, etc. – have at once shaped medicine and invited critique. Using readings from a range of sources illuminating key medical technologies in the 18th- to 21st-century U.S., we will analyze these technologies in historical, social, and theoretical context. Questions guiding our work will include: What are the historical roots of significant medical technologies? How did these technologies shape medicine? Why have physicians and the pubic embraced some medical technologies and not others? What non-medical technologies have influenced the development of medical technologies? How has the historiography of medical technology shaped the histories of medicine and science as academic disciplines? Has medical technology ever been "value free"?

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 credits. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Advanced.

1:00pm-2:15pm T/TH

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes University special and guest students.


Medical History and Bioethics 553:
International Health and Global Society

Instructor: Richard Keller

Intense concern over the burgeoning of emerging infectious diseases–along with the renewed vigor of known epidemics–has heightened medical, media, and popular attention to the international dimensions of health in a globalizing society. Yet historians have long recognized the “microbial unification of the world” as a phenomenon that dates at least to the Black Death of the fourteenth century. Drawing on a wide range of historical and anthropological materials and methods, this course explores the history of public health and medicine as international phenomena, concentrating chiefly on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Specific topics include the connections between global pandemics such as cholera and plague to European colonial expansion; the rise of international aid organizations; historical and contemporary anxieties about global migration and the spread of disease; and the international dimensions of a global medical marketplace. Particular themes include the connection between culture and medical ideas and practices; and the tensions of practicing medicine in multi-cultural settings.

Graduate students registered in 553 must register concurrently in MHB 753.

Crosslisted with History of Science and with Population Health.

3 credits. Either Humanities or Social Science. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

2:30pm-3:45pm T/TH (plus discussion session)

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or higher, includes graduate and professional careers.


Medical History and Bioethics 559-002:
Topics in Ethics and History of Medicine
Topic: Animal Bioethics

Instructor: Rob Streiffer

An in-depth study for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students of the main philosophical theories in animal ethics and a survey of the ways that empirical research is important for evaluating the truth of those theories as well as for understanding their practical implications. Although the exact content will vary from year to year, topics covered will include the moral status of animals, different conceptions of animal welfare, animals' mental lives, the use of animals in research, and the use of animals in agriculture. Additional topics could include disobedience on behalf of animals and the legal and regulatory aspects of animal use oversight.

Crosslisted with Philosophy 543-002.

3 credits.

2:25pm-4:55pm M

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 561:
Greek and Roman Medicine and Pharmacy

Instructor: John Scarborough

Greek and Roman medicine and drug lore from the Pre-Socratics to Oribasius (c. 600 B.C. - A.D. 350), including the backgrounds of ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian medicine.

Crosslisted with History of Science, History, Classics, and S&A Pharm.

3 credits. Humanities. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate or Advanced.

2:30pm-3:45pm T/TH

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or DPH or TOX.


Medical History and Bioethics 753:
International Health and Global Society

Instructor: Richard Keller

See MHB 553. Advanced readings that examine major problems in modern international health. Focus on epidemiology and disease ecology; political economy of health; migration; quarantine; international health research; cross-cultural healing; mental and maternal health; growth of international health organizations.

Not cross-listed

1 credit.

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Graduate status & concurrent registration in Medical History 553.


Medical History and Bioethics 919:
Topic: Readings in American Medicine and Public Health

Instructors: Ronald Numbers and Judith Leavitt

Each week during the semester we will read an assigned book. Each student in the seminar will assume responsibility for leading one or two class discussions (depending on enrollment), will write reviews (suitable for publication in the Bulletin of the History of Medicine) of 5 of the assigned books, and will write a final historiographical essay of no more than 10 double-spaced, typed pages, explaining how the assigned books reinforce or modify the narrative of American medicine present in the first half of Paul Starr's Pulitzer Prize-winning The Social Transformation of American Medicine (New York: Basic Books, 1982). Graduate students who have passed prelims are encouraged to register for the course. Their requirements are to keep up with the reading and come to seminar prepared to participate in the discussion; they are not required to do the written assignments.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 credits. A (Advanced)

Noon - 2:00pm Tuesday

Prerequisites: Graduate or Professional Level status only and consent of instructor.

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