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Courses for Spring 2013

Medical History and Bioethics 212:
The Physician in History

Instructor: Thomas Broman

This course presents an introductory survey of the history of medicine from Antiquity to the 20th Century, and is aimed primarily at students interested in careers in the health professions. It explains how the understanding of health and illness has evolved in Western culture, showing why particular ideas of illness came into dominance at different moments in history. Most importantly, by providing the "long perspective" on the history of medicine, the course attempts to challenge some widely held assumptions about how the advancement of science has contributed to modern medicine.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 cr.; H (Humanities), E (Elementary)

M/W 2:25PM - 3:15PM

Prerequisites: Open to Freshmen. For honors credit con reg in Hist Sci/Hist Med 284 or cons instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 213:
Global Environmental Health: An Interdisciplinary Introduction

Instructor: Richard C. Keller

The course provides an introduction to the intersections of health and environment on a global scale. Exposes students to a range of problems in global environmental health, including climate change, disease ecology, and the globalization of disease.

Not cross-listed

3 cr.; H (Humanities or Social Science), E (Elementary)

Tu/Th 1:00PM - 2:15PM


Medical History and Bioethics 284:
The Physician in History (Honors)

Instructor: Thomas H. Broman

Honors course for students enrolled concurrently for honors in History of Science 212. Open to non-honors students with consent of instructor.

Cross-listed with History of Science

1 cr.; H (Humanities), E (Elementary)

F 1:20PM - 2:10PM

Prerequisites: Con reg for honors in Hist Sci/Hist Med 212 or cons inst. Open to Fr.


Medical History and Bioethics 507:
Health, Disease and Healing I

Instructor: Pablo F. Gomez

This course examines the history of healing practices in the Western World from antiquity to the 18th century. Students will examine continuities and changes in ideas about illness and health and the role of medicine in the larger social and cultural context of particular historical periods.

Cross-listed with History and History of Science.

3 cr., H (Humanities), I (Intermediate)

Tu/Th 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or Higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 509:
The Development of Public Health in America

Instructor: Dayle DeLancey

This course surveys the history of public health in the United States from the colonial period to the late twentieth century, emphasizing many issues in the development of public responsibility for health that are relevant at the beginning of the 21st century, including responses to epidemic diseases. The course is run as a seminar/discussion, and part of the student requirements include regular and constructive class participation.

Cross-listed with History of Science

3 cr.; B (Biological Science), I (Intermediate);

M/W 2:30PM - 3:45PM

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or Higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 515:
Public Health Ethics

Instructor: J. Paul Kelleher

This course focuses on ethical issues implicated in a population-level approach to disease prevention and health promotion. Students will explore prominent theoretical approaches to public health ethics and will engage with several ethical tensions. Issues discussed include: the use of coercive or intrusive public health interventions that restrict individual freedom, infringe upon individual privacy, and/or invite individual harm (or risks of harm); the justification of paternalistic measures in societies or sub-populations that seemingly indulge in pleasurable yet unhealthy behaviors; the extent to which societies should hold individuals responsible for their health conditions; the need to choose between the identifiable victims we can save with expensive measures here and now and the more numerous unidentifiable victims we could save in the future with the same monetary investment; the trade-offs between maximizing aggregate health benefits and addressing the special needs of vulnerable social sub-groups and individuals; climate change and intergenerational justice; ethical issues in international pharmaceutical research; and the health-equity implications of prominent social determinants of health.

Cross-listed with Philosophy

3 cr.; H (Humanities), A (Advanced)

Tu/Th 2:30PM - 3:45PM

Prerequisites: Junior standing or Senior standing or Graduate standing required.


Medical History and Bioethics 523:
Race, American Medicine and Public Health

Instructor: Susan E. Lederer

The problem of the 20th century, wrote W.E.B. DuBois in The Souls of Black Folk (1903), "is the problem of the color-line." This course considers the issue of the color line in American medicine over the past two centuries. We will be looking at the ways in which skin color (and other elements of "racial identity") have influenced the experiences of patients, physicians and nurses, and medical researchers, seeking to document and analyze how conceptions of race have shaped the health concerns and health outcomes of Americans in the past two hundred years. Topics include the origins of racial classification, the health and medical care of slaves, the use of minorities as research subjects, especially the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, the history of racial disparities in medicine, and the efforts to integrate the American medical profession.

Cross-listed with History of Science and with Afro-American Studies

3 cr.; S (Social Science), D (Intermediate or Advanced)

Tu/Th 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or Higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 532:
The History of the (American) Body

Instructor: Judith A. Houck

Perhaps it all started with the nature-nurture debate. By dividing the living world into biology (flesh, blood, genes, hormones, germs) and culture (environment, politics, tradition, commerce, history), we have come to regard bodies as objects immune to historical forces. This course challenges this understanding of bodies. By focusing primarily on American bodies in the 19th and 20th centuries, this course demonstrates that human bodies have social and cultural histories. The lived experience and cultural meanings of human bodies are dependent on their social settings. Biology is surely not irrelevant to bodily experience. But the interpretation and valuation of biology, indeed what is considered biological, change over time. This course will highlight the social values placed on different bodies and the changing social expectations bodies create. This course will pay particular attention to the following questions: How have cultural and social changes in American history influenced the meaning and experience of bodies? How have attempts to establish social status and difference focused on bodies? How has the social and economic value of bodies differed according to race, class, sex, and "fitness?" How has a focus on bodies individualized social problems?

Cross-listed History of Science and with Gender and Women’s Studies

3 cr.; H (Humanities), A (Advanced)

Tu/Th 9:30AM - 10:45AM

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or Higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 558:
Ethical Issues in Health Care

Instructor: Norman C. Fost

Ethical issues apparently created by new biomedical technologies, such as genetic screening, prenatal diagnosis, prolongation of life, treatment of severe birth defects, in vitro fertilization, behavior modification, psychosurgery, and transplantation.

Cross-listed with Philosophy

3 cr.; H (Humanities), I (Intermediate)

Tu 11:00AM - 12:15PM

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or Higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 562:
Byzantine Medicine and Pharmacy

Instructor: John Scarborough

Byzantine and Islamic medicine and drug lore from Oribasius to the beginnings of the Italian Renaissance (c. 350-c. 1400 A.D.).

Crosslisted with S&A Pharmacy, History, History of Science, and Medieval

3 cr.; H (Humanities), D (Intermediate or Advanced)

Tu/Th 2:30PM - 3:45PM

Prerequisites: Junior standing or DPH or TOX


Medical History and Bioethics 565:
The Ethics of Modern Biotechnology

Instructor: Robert Streiffer

Study of ethical issues arising from the application of modern biotechnology to microorganisms, crops, and non-human animals. Readings cover moral theory, technology studies, political philosophy, the science used in biotechnology, and current regulations governing its use.

Cross-listed with Agronomy, Philosophy, and Community and Environmental Sociology.

3 credits; Humanities. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

2:25 - 4:55pm Mondays

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or Higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 668-001:
Health, Disease and Medicine in the History of Latin America and the Caribbean

Instructor: Pablo F. Gomez

This course examines the history of illness and medical practice in Latin America and the Caribbean from the colonial era until the present. Using an interdisciplinary set of sources, students will explore the different meanings of disease, body normativity, medical practice, and ideas about public health across different historical circumstances in the region.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 cr.; A (Advanced)

Tu/Th 1:00PM - 2:15PM

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or Higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 709:
Development of Public Health in America

Instructor: Dayle B. DeLancey

Advanced readings in primary and secondary literature concerning public health issues and problems in America from the eighteenth to the twentieth century, and efforts made toward their solutions.

Not cross-listed

1 cr.

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Grad st & con reg in Med Hist 509.


Medical History and Bioethics 730:
Ethical Issues in Population Health

Instructors: Norman C. Fost and J. Paul Kelleher

This course will explore central ethical issues in public health and health policy in eight interactive discussion sessions of 1.5 hours each over a 4-week period, probably 5:30-7:00pm Tuesday and Thursday, but the time may be modified if more convenient for the majority.

Course topics will include: Alternative approaches to rationing health care (triage and policy levels) and their relative merits; the shape of rights to health and health care; measuring health states to determine the effectiveness of public health interventions (QALYs and DALYs); paternalism and personal responsibility for risky health behaviors; determinants of health, including the effects of income inequality and relative social status ("The Status Syndrome"); the role of genetic predisposition in allocating resources; distinctions between positive rights (entitlements) and negative rights (immunities) and their implication for public health policy; duties to future generations.

Not cross-listed

1 cr.; Graduate, advanced

Tu/Th 5:30PM - 7:00PM (Jan-Feb)

Prerequisites: Limited to 4th year medical students.


Medical History and Bioethics 999:
Advanced Independent Study

Instructor: Richard C. Keller

Not cross-listed

1-3 cr.; A (Advanced)

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Grad stdts who have the Masters or equiv, or Postdoc fellows who wish to undertake an independent research project.

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