Early operating theater

Courses for Fall 2014

Medical History and Bioethics 212:
Bodies, Diseases, and Healers: An Introduction to the History of Medicine

Instructor: Thomas Broman

General Description: This course presents an introductory survey of the history of medicine from Antiquity to the 20th Century, and is aimed primarily at students interested in careers in the health professions. It explains how the understanding of health and illness has evolved in Western culture, showing why particular ideas of illness came into dominance at different moments in history. Most importantly, by providing the “long perspective” on the history of medicine, the course challenges some widely held assumptions about how the advancement of science has contributed to modern medicine.

The historical survey is divided into four units, each of which is based in a different view of the body. The first unit, called “The Humoral Body” explains the exceptionally flexible ideas of illness and its causes that were first developed in the ancient world and persisted for many centuries until well past 1700. Some of the ideas first developed in humoral medicine, such as the intimate interactions between the body and its environment, are still with us today. The second unit, called “The Anatomical-Morphological Body,” examines the body as a collection of discrete parts which perform particular functions in the body’s overall economy. This anatomical view of the body also developed in the ancient world, although anatomically based approaches to the study of illness really only became influential in the 1700s and 1800s. The third unit, “The Infected Body,” looks at how illness first came to be seen not merely as something affecting individuals, but also as something having important consequences for society as a whole. This kind of thinking first emerged in the wake of the Black Death in 14th-century Europe, and it was important in the development of the Germ Theory of Disease in the latter part of the 19th century. Finally, the fourth unit of the course will look at “The body normalized and measured,” an appropriate label for medicine in the 20th century, when physicians developed the idea that seemingly no one’s health could be maintained without incessant medical attention and supervision. Needless to say, this is the view of health and illness that persists in our own time. In this unit we also consider how health has become something that can be purchased like any other consumer product, as for example in the case of plastic surgery to correct minor flaws in one’s appearance.

Course Requirements: Aside from attendance in discussion sections, the basic requirement for the course consists of a mixture of three take-home essays, ranging from three to seven pages, which are based in the readings and meant to illustrate the major issues in each unit. Discussion sections may also feature some shorter and more informal writing assignments.

Texts: Xeroxed course reader.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 credits; H (Humanities), E (Elementary) Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S; Open to Freshmen

Monday/Wednesday 2:25 - 3:15 pm, plus a discussion section

Prerequisites: Open to Freshmen. For honors credit con reg in Hist Sci/Hist Med 284 or cons instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 505:
Topics in Ethics and History of Medicine
Topic: Justice and Health Care

Instructor: J. Paul Kelleher

This course will examine ethical issues in the distribution, financing, and delivery of health care in the United States. We will focus in particular on central issues raised by the recent U.S. health care reform debate and resulting legislation. Readings will be drawn from political philosophy, health care economics, behavioral economics, nonprofit thinktank white papers, Congressional testimony, news articles, and blog posts. The first half of the class will consist of units exploring the philosophical and economic bases underlying currently dominant perspectives on putative entitlements to health care. We will seek to understand health economists' concern to promote the "efficiency" of health resource allocation while constraining the "moral hazard" they detect when individuals use "too much" health care. In this context we will strive to identify values that may either compete with or override concerns with efficiency, so construed. The second half of the class will consist of units investigating the nature, justifiability, and methods of health care rationing-including bedside rationing by doctors-and the myriad issues implicated by the near-universally shared goal of health care cost containment. If time allows, we will further examine one of the following two questions: (1) Are there ethically defensible alternatives to the current patent regime for pharmaceutical development that could reduce drug costs while offering adequate or even enhanced levels of innovation?; (2) What, if anything, does a just government owe immigrants (legal and illegal) when it comes to health care?

Crosslisted with Philosophy

3 credits; H (Humanities) A (Advanced)

Tuesday/Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 507:
Health, Disease and Healing I

Instructor: Pablo F. Gomez

This course examines the history of healing practices in the Western World from antiquity to the 18th century. Students will examine continuities and changes in ideas about illness and health, and the position of healers and health institutions, within larger social and cultural structures in particular historical periods. We will focus on the characteristics of patient-healer relationships and cultural, legal and social perceptions and definitions of body normativity, health and disease in the diverse societies covered under the “Western” rubric.

Cross-listed with History and History of Science

3 credits, H (Humanities), I (Intermediate)

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 513:
Environment and Health in Global Perspective

Instructor: Gregg Mitman

What explains the distribution of different diseases around the world and how have these patterns changed over time? In what ways have the growth of cities, new industries, extractive economies, mass migrations, and “global colonialism” shaped human health? How has the rise of emerging diseases shaped visions of the global environment?

This course begins to answer such questions by exploring the dynamic interplay between environment and health over the last 300 years. We will consider both the history of ideas about environment and illness as well as the ways in which changing environments have affected well-being. In addition, we will examine how place - from agricultural plantations to the factory floor, from health resorts to toxic waste sites - has mattered to the experience of illness, the production of knowledge, and the control of disease. We will also investigate various social, economic, and political forces that have historically shaped inequitable environmental and disease burdens and the different struggles for health and environmental justice that have occurred across the globe.

Crosslisted with Environmental Studies and History of Science

3 credits. Either Humanities or Social Science. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Advanced

Monday/Wednesday 2:30 - 3:45 pm

Prerequisites: Junior status. Graduate students must also register for 713 concurrently with 513.


Medical History and Bioethics 526:
Medical Technology and the Body

Instructor: Linda Hogle

There is a long history of bodily modification for functional restoration, augmentation, enhancement, or aesthetic purposes and may involve chemical, mechanical, interactive or implantable technologies. How do such technological alterations affect our identity? Our sense of being “human”? Our notions of “fairness”? What cultural, social and ethical issues are involved in decisions to take up particular technologies? This course explores examines assumptions about the ‘normal’ body, followed by cultural understandings of ability, appearance, function and enhancement. Topics will include bionics, regenerative medicine, genetic enhancements, assistive technologies, neural prosthetics, cognitive enhancements, digital health and quantified self technologies, among others. The course is of particular interest to students in pre-professional medical fields, biomedical engineers, social sciences, and disability studies.

Not cross-listed

3 credits; Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate

Mondays 4:00 pm - 6:40 pm

Prerequisites: Sophomore status or consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 545:
Ethical and Regulatory Issues in Clinical Investigation

Instructor: Norman Fost

This course will explore and examine the ethical issues central to clinical research, regulations governing clinical investigation, and the role of good clinical practice for clinical trials. Participants who master this course material will be able to think critically about the ethical issues central to clinical research and know the basic elements of the federal regulations affecting clinical investigation.

Not cross-listed

1 credit; Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Advanced

Wednesday 3:30 - 5:25 pm

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 550:
Topics: Medical Technologies in Historical Perspective

Instructor: Dayle DeLancey

From imaging devices to pharmaceuticals, medical technologies are often among the most novel and controversial aspects of contemporary society. Yet, U.S. history reveals that neither the emergence of high-profile medical technologies nor the dilemmas that often accompany their arrival are strictly ‘modern-day’ phenomena. History also demonstrates that such technologies tend to reflect not only the medical science, but also the social concerns, of the periods in which they have emerged. In this course, we will explore the ways in which a range of technologies – e.g. stethoscopes, spirometers, sphygmomanometers, hospital design, x-rays, reproductive technologies, gene therapy, virtual medicine, etc. – have at once shaped medicine and invited critique. Using readings from a range of sources illuminating key medical technologies in the 18th- to 21st-century U.S., we will analyze these technologies in historical, social, and theoretical context. Questions guiding our work will include: What are the historical roots of significant medical technologies? How did these technologies shape medicine? Why have physicians and the pubic embraced some medical technologies and not others? What non-medical technologies have influenced the development of medical technologies? How has the historiography of medical technology shaped the histories of medicine and science as academic disciplines? Has medical technology ever been “value free”?

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 credits; Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Advanced

Tuesday/Thursday 2:30 - 3:45pm

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes University special and guest students.


Medical History and Bioethics 553:
International Health and Global Society

Instructor: Richard Keller

Intense concern over the burgeoning of emerging infectious diseases–along with the renewed vigor of known epidemics-has heightened medical, media, and popular attention to the international dimensions of health in a globalizing society. Yet historians have long recognized the “microbial unification of the world” as a phenomenon that dates at least to the Black Death of the fourteenth century. Drawing on a wide range of historical and anthropological materials and methods, this course explores the history of public health and medicine as international phenomena, concentrating chiefly on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Specific topics include the connections between global pandemics such as cholera and plague to European colonial expansion; the rise of international aid organizations; historical and contemporary anxieties about global migration and the spread of disease; and the international dimensions of a global medical marketplace. Particular themes include the connection between culture and medical ideas and practices; and the tensions of practicing medicine in multi-cultural settings.

Graduate students registered in 553 must register concurrently in MHB 753.

Crosslisted with History of Science and with Population Health

3 credits; Either Humanities or Social Science. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate.

Tuesday/Thursday 1:00 - 2:15 pm (plus discussion session)

Prerequisites: Junior or Senior status, or consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 561:
Greek and Roman Medicine and Pharmacy

Instructor: John Scarborough

Greek and Roman medicine and drug lore from the Pre-Socratics to Oribasius (c. 600 B.C. - A.D. 350), including the backgrounds of ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian medicine.

Crosslisted with History of Science, History, Classics, and S&A Pharm.

3 credits; Humanities. Counts for Liberal Arts and Science credit in L&S. Intermediate or Advanced

Tuesday/Thursday 2:30 - 3:45pm

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or DPH or TOX.


Medical History and Bioethics 668-001:
Health and Citizenship

Instructor: Andrew R. Ruis

This course explores the relationship between health and citizenship. Among its key themes are the following questions: When did the link between health and human rights first emerge? How has it developed historically? What factors define citizenship? To what extent does physical and mental health constitute a gauge of enfranchisement and of one’s access to power in the modern state? In what ways does the de facto absence of citizenship - in cases like those of ethnic minorities, the desperately poor, and colonial subject populations - delimit the possibility of a human right to health? How have structural health inequities historically posed significant threats to global security? Such questions have been central to studies of the political economy of health and disease, anthropology, and area studies, but have been less apparent in historical research. This course offers a key means for integrating these questions into an interdisciplinary approach to global health.

The course will focus primarily on the development of the relationship between health and citizenship in modern Europe beginning with the French Revolution and through the rise of the welfare state before exploring the implications of ideas about health and human rights in a global context.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 credits

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00 am - 12:15 pm

Prerequisites: Must have Junior standing or higher. Includes graduate and professional careers. Excludes university specials and guests.


Medical History and Bioethics 699:
Independent Study in Medical History

Instructor: Staff

To be arranged with instructor.

Not cross-listed

1-3 credits; C (counts for L&S), A (Advanced)

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Jr st and cons instr.


Medical History and Bioethics 713:
Environment and Health in Global Perspective

Instructor: Gregg Mitman

A satellite graduate seminar that explores the issues covered in 513 in greater depth, required of graduate students enrolled in Med Hist 513

Crosslisted with Environmental Studies and History of Science

1 credit

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Graduate status and concurrent registration in Med Hist 513.


Medical History and Bioethics 726:
Medical Technology and the Body

Instructor: Linda Hogle

There is a long history of bodily modification for functional restoration, augmentation, enhancement, or aesthetic purposes and may involve chemical, mechanical, interactive or implantable technologies. How do such technological alterations affect our identity? Our sense of being “human”? Our notions of “fairness”? What cultural, social and ethical issues are involved in decisions to take up particular technologies? This course explores examines assumptions about the ‘normal’ body, followed by cultural understandings of ability, appearance, function and enhancement. Topics will include bionics, regenerative medicine, genetic enhancements, assistive technologies, neural prosthetics, cognitive enhancements, digital health and quantified self technologies, among others. The course is of particular interest to students in pre-professional medical fields, biomedical engineers, social sciences, and disability studies.

Graduate students taking 726 will concurrently enroll in 526 and pursue independent research in consultation with the instructor.

Not cross-listed

1 credit

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Graduate status and concurrent registration in Med Hist 526 or consent of Instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 734:
Graduate Studies in Medical Ethics: Public Health Law

Instructor: R. Alta Charo

This course will survey examples of classic public health efforts mediated through law, including surveillance, screening, quarantine, vaccination, birth control, sanitation, food safety, nutrition, and physical fitness. It will also touch on some modern areas of activity, such as newborn genetic screening, smoking cessation, accident prevention, gun control, domestic violence reporting, and obesity reduction. There is no course book, but assignments will be drawn from articles in history, philosophy, political science, medicine, public health and law, as well from videos and digital archives. The course is open to enrollment from all students at the law school and to graduate level students from the School of Medicine and Public Health (i.e. MD or master’s programs, and above). In lieu of a final exam, students will prepare final papers from a list of current topics. Topics and expectations will be adjusted to coordinate with the students’ various degree programs, so that law students will write papers focused more on legal issues, SMPH students on medical and public health issues etc. Students will be graded separately, within their respective degree programs. Con Law 1 and 2 are not prerequisites, but are recommended for the law students, especially when considering the civil rights issues raised by government efforts to control personal behaviors.

Meets with Law and Population Health

2 credits

Wednesday 3:30 - 5:30 pm

Prerequisites: Grad st or cons inst.


Medical History and Bioethics 753:
International Health and Global Society

Instructor: Richard C. Keller

See MHB 553. Advanced readings in primary and secondary literature.

Not cross-listed

1 credit.

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Graduate status & concurrent registration in Medical History 553.


Medical History and Bioethics 919:
Topic: Merchandising Medicine: History, Anthropological, and Ethical Perspectives

Instructors: Susan Lederer and Linda Hogle

“Public health is purchasable,” Hermann Biggs, Chief of the Public Health Department of New York City famously said. So are many other things associated with health: medical care (including nursing and rehabilitation therapies), healing treatments (pharmaceuticals, herbal medicines, diet supplements, vitamin water, prosthetics, implants, organs). This graduate seminar uses theoretical and historical methods in considering the ways in which medicine and commerce are interrelated, from the commercialization of the blood supply, tissue, organ, “egg donation,” 23andme, FitBit data, dietary supplements and diet plans, and even care itself.

Crosslisted with History of Science

3 credits

Wednesday 9:00 - 11:00 am

Prerequisites: Graduate status and consent of instructor.


Medical History and Bioethics 999:
Advanced Independent Study

Instructor: Staff

Not cross-listed

1-3 credits

Time to be arranged

Prerequisites: Grad stdts who have the Masters or equiv, or Postdoc fellows who wish to undertake an independent research project. Instructor Consent Required.

© 2018 University of Wisconsin Board of Regents